Privacy or If I Were a Celebrity

17 01 2013

Before you and I begin to discuss this topic, I’d like to recommend the following speech from the Golden Globes:

Jodie Foster’s Golden Globes Speech

So…where to begin? I’ve read a few blogs that criticise this “coming out.” Now, there’s the ever-present right-wing Christian fanatic that will consistently put a plague on any gay person that they encounter, their household and their family. There’s those who were a little shocked about her officially biting the bullet and coming out as a gay person. There’s those who are gay and are criticising her for waiting so long. There’s people who will now refuse to see her films and movies, simply because she identifies as a gay person. There’s some who are rallying around her, saying she did a good thing by coming out.

But the thing is, they’re all missing her point. Somewhere, along the way, we have forgotten and dehumanized our celebrities. Jodie Foster mentions in her speech that somewhere along the lines, we expect our stars to divulge the small little details of their lives, simply because there is no end to our curiosity of other people.

And I totally get that. I do.

I get really frustrated with people when they start asking and trying to deconstruct the private details of my life. Often I snap at them, which is not the appropriate way to deal with such an issue, but until I figure out a better way to skirt these sensitive issues, I will probably continue to snap at people.

Why is nothing sacred anymore? Why are there no things and subjects left unreached? Where is the mystery behind a person?

I am a private person, and I totally agree with Jodie Foster, that such issues can be within the realm of privacy of the individual, because that person so chooses to skirt issues, and to refuse to divulge information which they don’t feel comfortable with doing. When we read the tabloids and we finance the presses that search for skeletons in the closets of our stars, we deny them the privilege of privacy and we deny them that ability to save the last remaining ounces of the individualism that saves them from becoming an emotionless person on the screen. We deny them the chance and opportunity to save the last remaining ounces of our privacy.

For this reason, I despise the press and the tabloids. I despise the celebrity-ness of it all. Because I am such a high valuer of privacy, I do not think that this celebritydom would suit me. I do not think this version of the world would be an attractive one for me. Instead, I enjoy my boring life, on my couch with a puzzle or a book. This is the kind of life that attracts me. A quiet dinner, lovely conversation. A nice night out at the movies, complaining about the lack of audience etiquette with their cell phones and the making out. Listening to the music in my car as I drive down the highway from work. Going to work, a place where I get no recognition from the higher-ups, but my customers know my name and they know the kind of person I am. Moments with my family and friends as we live life together, talking about the events of the days, how much our jobs suck or how deeply we are in love with coffee. These are the private moments that I would miss if I were to be a celebrity. If I were a celebrity, then each of these moments would be ruined by questions by the photographers, snaps and flashes of light. Those I spend my time with would have their lives bombarded with questions about me. Then, those moments would cease to exist, because they would be more trouble than they’re worth.

So no, I’ll take my boring predictable life, I’ll take my privacy and enjoy it. Money is not worth losing my privacy, because that’s exactly what makes me human.

Do you value your privacy?  or What makes you feel especially human?

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